Col. Andrew D. Seely

Personal

Gender: Male

Date of Birth: May 5, 1842

Birth Place: Berwick, PA

Col. Andrew D. Seely, whose portrait is shown on the opposite page, one of the valued citizens of the town of Berwick and superintendent of the paint department of The Jackson & Woodin Manufacturing Company of that town, was born in Berwick, May 5, 1842, and is a son of Nathan and Catherine (Krisher) Seely, and a grandson of Samuel and Margaret (Cortright) Seely.

Samuel Seely’s birth-place is not known, but he resided in Strasburg, Pa., nearly all his life, engaged in farming and teamstering. While hauling a load of goods from Philadelphia to his home town he was killed in a run-away accident. He was united in marriage with Margaret Cortright who bore him five children, namely: John, Nathan, Hannah, Huldah, and Andrew. Mrs. Seely formed a second marriage union with Samuel Santee and they were the parents of three children: Samuel, Isaac and Robert.

The father of our subject was born in 1810, and was a blacksmith by trade, having served an apprenticeship to that trade in the shop of Thomas Cole of Berwick. He moved to Orangeville, Pa., where he embarked in business on his own account, but later removed to Berwick where he followed his trade the rest of his active days. He served as major in the state militia; as inspector of the Second Brigade; and as captain of the Light Horse Artillery. He also served as constable of the town. He erected the house in which Lyman Fowler now resides. His wife was Catherine Krisher and they were the parents of two children, namely: Andrew D., our subject; and Fanny E. The latter became the wife of G.D. Jacoby of Berwick, and they reared the following children: Warren, Boyd, Kate, the wife of H.S. Williams; Mary, deceased; Sally, who is the wife of J.J. Sitler, Annie, who is the wife of G.F. Vandoozer; and Etta. The father of our subject died in 1865.

Andrew D. Seely acquired a good education in the common schools and them learned the trade of a stonecutter and worked for Capt. A.H. Rush of Berwick until the breaking out of the Rebellion. April 20, 1861, he enlisted in Company C., 16th Reg., Penna. Vol. Inf., which was one of the first companies sworn into the Union service during the Civil War. Three months later he re-enlisted in the 84th Regiment, which, on account of the loss of men, was later merged with the 57th Regiment. When our subject was mustered out, on July 25, 1865, he was sergeant of his company. Returning home he was employed at the works of The Jackson & Woodin Manufacturing Company, where he now has charge of the paint department and has some twenty men under his supervision.

August 27, 187-, our subject was made captain of the Jackson Guards, serving at Scranton, Pa., in 1871; December 31, 1871, he was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the 17th Regiment and served during the riot at the Susquehanna Depot in 1874; he saw active service at WIlkesbarre and Hazleton; at which places he was on Maj. Osbourne’s staff; in 1877, on the re-organization of the National Guard of Pennsylvania, he was made aide-de-camp of the Third Brigade under Gen. Siegfried; he was also made aide-de-camp on Gov. Pattison’s staff with the rank of lieutenant-colonel. Col. Seely did effective service during the riots at Homestead, Pa. He has assisted in quelling all the riots in the state and has won the highest praise for the good judgment he displayed.

Col. Seely on March 25, 1878 was joined in the bonds of matrimony with Miranda C. Stackhouse. Our subject is a member of the Knights of Malta; G.A.R.; Society of the Army of the Potomac; Knights of the Golden Eagle; P.O.S. of A.; Camp No. 32, U.V.L.; Lodge No. 436, B.P.O.E., of Bloomsburg, Pa.; and Col. A.D. Seely Camp, No. 25, Sons of Veterans. He has been a member and chief of the fire department for the last seven years; has served as burgess of the borough of Berwick; and as health officer eight years. Mrs. Seely is a member of the Woman’s Relief Corps, and is a very active worker in the organization. Col. Seely occupies a resident, No. 309 East Front street, which is one of the finest in the borough and is equipped with every modern improvement. Col. Seely holds a commission on the retired list of the National Guard of Pennsylvania and is entitled to be the guest of the governor of Pennsylvania upon all state occasions.

Pages 409-410. “Book of Biographies, This volume contains Biographical Sketches of Leading Citizens of the Seventeenth Congressional District Pennsylvania” published by Biographical Publishing Company, Buffalo, N.Y., Chicago, Ill, 1899.

[Son of Nathan SGS # 3471 – Andrew; Nathan (SGS #3471); Samuel; Michael; John; Samuel; Jonas; Obadiah]

* this is another biography from a different source

Col. Andrew D. Seely, of Berwick, Columbia Co., is undoubtedly the best known citizen of that town and section, where he has passed all his life with the exception of absences necessitated by military service. His long and creditable connection with the State militia, the services he has rendered the community in responsible public positions, and above all, his high personal character, make him worthy of the high estimation and confidence of his fellow citizens, which he holds to an unusual degree. He has had charge of the painting department of the American Car & Foundry Company’s plant at Berwick for forty-nine years.

Colonel Seely was born at Berwick, May 5, 1842, son of Nathan and Catherine (Krischer) Seely, and grandson of Samuel and Margaret (Cortright) Seely. Samuel Seely resided at Stoudsburg, Monroe Co., Pa., nearly all his life, engaged in farming and teaming. While hauling a load of goods from Philadelphia to his home town he was killed in a runaway accident. He married Margaret Cortright and they had five children, namely: John, Nathan, Hannah, Huldah and Andrew. Mrs. Seely later married Samuel Santee, and they were the parents of three children: Samuel, Isaac and Robert.

Nathan Seely was born May 10, 1812, in New Hampshire, and came to Berwick in an early day, before the town was so called. There he served an apprenticeship to the trade of blacksmith in the shop of Thomas Cole, and later moved to Orangeville, Columbia Co., Pa., where he engaged in business on his own account. Returning to Berwick, he followed his trade there for the rest of his active days. He assisted in the organization of the town and took considerable part in its public affairs; held the office of constable; and was particularly interested in military matters. He was captain of the Light Horse Artillery, which he organized, inspector of the 2d Brigade of the State militia, and attained the rank of major in the militia. His death occurred Jan. 16, 1865, and he is buried in Beach Grove cemetery. At Berwick he married, on Feb. 22, 1838, Catherine Krischer, who was born in Columbia county, Aug. 15, 1815, and she survived him, dying Feb. 22, 1881. The following children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Seely: Theodore W., born Sept. 28, 1839, who died Feb. 2, 1840; Frances Elmira, born Sept 29, 1840; and Andrew Dingman, who is mentioned later. The daughter, Frances Elmira, attended private school at Mauch Chunk, and afterwards married George D. Jacoby, a resident of Berwick. Mr. and Mrs. Jacoby had the following children: Warren; Boyd; Kate, who is Mrs. H.S. Williams; Mary, deceased; Sally, Mrs. H.J. Sitler; Annie, Mrs. G.F. Vandoozer; and Henrietta, who married Robert E.P., Jr., and Edwin B. Mrs. Frances Elmira Jacoby died Feb. 8, 1901. Nathan Seely was a Democrat, and a member of the Lutheran Church.

Andrew D. Seely had such advantages as the public schools of Berwick afforded, and later attended the select school in Bloomsburg which was taught by Joel E. Bradley. He went to learn marble cutting with Capt. A.H. Rush, of Berwick, remaining with him until he sold out, about which time the Civil war broke out, and the young man went to the support of the Union. On April 20, 1861, he enlisted, becoming a member of Company C, 16th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry – the first company in the State sworn in for three years. It was assigned, however, to a three months’ regiment, and having served that length of time was permitted by the governor to return home. Three months later young Seely reenlisted, this time joining Company H, of the 84th Regiment, which on account of the great loss of men was later merged into the 57th Regiment, 3d Corps, Army of the Potomac, under Gen. Daniel E. Sickles. After the battle of Gettysburg, the 3d Corps was consolidated into the 2d Corps, under Gen. Winfield S. Hancock. Under his second enlistment Colonel Seely served three years and four months, receiving his discharge June 15, 1865, at Washington D.C. At that time he was sergeant of his company. He took part in many battles, including Bull Run, Gettysburg, Chancellorsville (where his regiment lost 265 men and eleven officers), the Wilderness, Cold Harbor and Spottsylvania, on through to the surrender of Lee. At Chancellorsville he was taken prisoner, but was recaptured by the 1st Corps of the Army of the Potomac.

Returning to Berwick at the close of his army service, Colonel Seely entered the employ of the Jackson & Woodin Manufacturing Company, and on April 5, 1866, became engaged in the painting department, of which he became foreman July 4th of that year. He has continued to be head of this department ever since, the plant now belonging, however, to the American Car & Foundry Company.

Colonel Seely has long been associated with the administration of borough affairs, and he is still serving on the board of health, of which he has been a member for a number of years; he was a member and chief of the fire department for several years, and has served as burgess of the borough. On purely political questions he is a stanch Democrat.

Colonel Seely is one of the well known officers of the National Guard in Pennsylvania. On Aug. 27. 1870, he was made lieutenant of the Jackson Guards, serving in the riots at Scranton, Pa., in 1871; was subsequently made captain and major; on Dec. 31, 1871 , was commissioned lieutenant colonel of the 17th Regiment, and served during the riot of the Susquehanna depot in 1874. He saw active service at Wilkes-Barre and Hazleton, at which place he was on Major General Osborn’s staff. In 1877, on the reorganization of the National Guard of Pennsylvania, he was made aide de camp of the 3d Brigade under General Siegfried; he was also made aide de camp of Governor Pattison’s staff with the rank of Lieutenant colonel, serving four years. Colonel Seely did effective work during the riots at Homestead, Pa. He has assisted in quelling all the riots in the State in his time, and has won the highest praise for the good judgment he displayed. He holds a commission on the retired list of the National Guard of Pennsylvania, and is entitled to the guest of the governor of Pennsylvania upon all State occasions. He has served as marshal of the day at Berwick on Decoration Day for the last thirty years.

The Colonel was one of the first directors of the Berwick Water Company, and is now president of the Berwick Building & Loan Association, having held that office for a number of years.

The Colonel has numerous social connections. He is a prominent member of Capt. C.G. Jackson Post, No. 159, G.A.R., at Berwick, of which he has been quartermaster for twenty-five years; an honorary member of Col. A.D. Selly Camp, No. 25, Sons of Veterans, which was named after him; member of the Union Veteran Legion (Camp No. 32, Bloomsburg), made up of three years’ men of the Civil war; of the Society of the Army of the Potomac; and was the first president of the Columbia County Veterans’ Association, which is composed of Union soldiers of the county. He is a Knight of the Golden Eagle; a charter member of Susquehanna Commandery, No. 18, of the Knights of Malta, and a member of Berwick Lodge, No. 1138, B.P.O. Elks. In religious connection he is a member of the Presbyterian Church. For many years he had charge of the Christmas entertainments of the First Methodist Sunday school.

On March 25, 1878, Colonel Seely married Miranda C. Stackhouse, a native of Berwick, born March 31, 1841, who died Nov. 28, 1899. She was a member of the Woman’s Relief Corps and an active worker in that organization. On Feb. 25, 1903, the Colonel married (second) Mrs. Iona May (Arnold) Lynch, who was born June 9, 1865, in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., and first married Frank R. Lynch of Wilkes-Barre, who died Jan. 29, 1891. Colonel and Mrs. Seely reside at No. 317 Front street, in a substantial modern residence, one of the finest in the borough. As one of the oldest residents in the town, and who has been notably active and efficient in its upbuilding, Colonel Seely is one of its most honored citizens.

Pages 856-858 “Historical and Biographical Annuals of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Volume II, published by J.H. Beers & Co., Chicago, 1915.

[Son of Nathan SGS # 3471 – Andrew; Nathan (SGS #3471); Samuel; Michael; John; Samuel; Jonas; Obadiah]